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. one of the things that steve has worked on a great deal, and i do not want to take away his thunder, a look at how americans will stay competitive -- if we look at how america will stay competitive -- i hear your phone -- [laughter] the question of whether or not a merkel be able to compete, whether we will be able to make investments, are we -- are we going to be able to have the kind of innovation that creates jobs? north of 80% of the net new jobs made in america in the last 20 years have come from start-ups. where had the talent come from? disproportionately from a first generation americans. we are very lucky particularly in northern virginia, which rivals only the silicon valley in terms of the number of tech- related startups, you look a little deeper, and a 1 1/3 of the tech startups in northern virginia had one of the co- founders or founders as a first generation american. the numbers in the valley are even higher. how do we maintain that? one is talent. i will come back to that in a moment. another piece of this which we think is very complementary and something that stev
teresa sullivan and steve case, the founder of aol. >> we have instructed the panel is not to say hello to friends and family, so i will do it for them. hi, mom, i kids. tonight's keynote concludes a series of discussions about the problems, prospects, and policies are running high skilled immigration policy in the u.s. this morning at the miller center washington d.c. office, we have brought to the panelists from law, economics, and the private sector to debate and deliberate about a range of topics related to high skilled immigration. our discussion was framed by which isng at s.aessay, available on the miller center web site. our first session this morning, they compared the united states h1b policy to the blue card initiative and the european union. gary friedman focused on the public's underlying immigration policy and concluded that immigration policy in the u.s. is reasonable and rational, given the structure of the u.s.'s interest group-based system of political expression. susan marcum of georgetown university's institute for international emigration argued, and many agreed, th
your crystal balls and tell us, the next 12 months, what will happen on this issue? steve? >> i am cautiously optimistic. six months ago, it passed with broad bipartisan support. with they came together on that legislation because it was important to provide sbrures with capital even though they said nothing could get done, something did get done. the good news people recognize the issue is important and there is a general agreement on the solution around high skilled immigration. the problem is is the politics and the economy and jobs have been prumped by the politics of immigration. i think there are four paths. one could be the pass the senate not be taken up in the senate. there is a lottery that would flult raising the overall level of immigration. if there was an agreement to include that that bill could be passed. a second option which is what the president has ind indicated he favors is to link high skilled immigration with the dream act. so it is a broader solution around immigration. the third would be to say this deals with the 50,000, this deals with a million five. the
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3